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Consumer Price Index

This dataset contains USA Consumer Price Index  2019 - 2020  Data from U.S. BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS. Follow datasource.kapsarc.org for timely data to advance energy economics research.

Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (CPI-U): U.S. city average, by expenditure category, February 2020
[1982-84=100, unless otherwise noted]
Footnotes:
(1) The 'effect' of an item category is a measure of that item's contribution to the All items price change. For example, if the Food index had an effect of 0.40, and the All items index rose 1.2 percent, then the increase in food prices contributed 0.40 / 1.2, or 33.3 percent, to that All items increase.  Said another way, had food prices been unchanged for that month, or year, the change in the All items index would have been 1.2 percent minus 0.40, or 0.8 percent.  Effects can be negative as well.  For example, if the effect of food was a negative 0.1, and the All items index rose 0.5 percent, the All items index actually would have been 0.1 percent higher (or 0.6 percent) had food prices been unchanged.  Since food prices fell while prices overall were rising, the contribution of food to the All items price change was negative (in this case, -0.1 / 0.5, or minus 20 percent).
(2) A statistic's margin of error is often expressed as its point estimate plus or minus two standard errors.  For example, if a CPI category rose 0.6 percent, and its standard error was 0.15 percent, the margin of error on this item's 1-month percent change would be 0.6 percent, plus or minus 0.3 percent.  If a 12-month percent change rose 2.6 percent, and its standard error was 0.25 percent, the margin of error on this item's 12-month percent change would be 2.6 percent, plus or minus 0.5 percent.
(3) If the current seasonally adjusted 1-month percent change is greater than the previous published 1-month percent change, then this column identifies the closest prior month with a 1-month percent change as (L)arge as or (L)arger than the current 1-month change.  If the current 1-month percent change is smaller than the previous published 1-month percent change, the most recent month with a change as (S)mall or (S)maller than the current month change is identified.  If the current and previous published 1-month percent changes are equal, a dash will appear.  Standard numerical comparisons are used.  For example, 0.8% is greater than 0.6%, -0.4% is less than -0.2%, and -0.2% is less than 0.0%.  Note that a (L)arger change can be a smaller decline, for example, a -0.2% change is larger than a -0.4% change, but still represents a decline in the price index.  Likewise, (S)maller changes can be increases, for example, a 0.6% change is smaller than 0.8%, but still represents an increase in the price index.  In this context, a -0.2% change is considered to be smaller than a 0.0% change.  The same comparison is done for the 12-month percent change.
(4) Not seasonally adjusted.
(5) Indexes on a December 1997=100 base.
(6) Special indexes based on a substantially smaller sample.  These series do not contribute to the all items index aggregation and therefore do not have a relative importance or effect.
(7) Indexes on a December 2007=100 base.
(8) Indexes on a December 2005=100 base.
(9) Indexes on a December 1986=100 base.
(10) Indexes on a December 1993=100 base.
(11) Indexes on a December 2009=100 base.
(12) Indexes on a December 1990=100 base.
(13) Indexes on a December 1983=100 base.
(14) Indexes on a December 2001=100 base.
(15) Indexes on a December 1982=100 base.
(16) Indexes on a December 1996=100 base.
(17) Indexes on a December 1988=100 base.

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